Sorbetto Part 1

So…this mystery fabric is going to be two Colette Sorbetto blouses. One for my daughter, which, by these measurements, is about a size 0-2, and one for me…with my shoulder width on top, I’m going to opt for the size 10.

Details
Details

Now, a note or two about Colette patterns. If you have the choice between printing a Colette pattern, or buying a printed booklet at a store or having it shipped, always go for the booklet. Colette patterns are a thing of beauty and perfection. I’m not just saying that because Sarai is a Portlander too – I don’t even know the lovely lady – I’m saying it because they really are of the highest quality and worth every penny. Regardless, she includes instructions and tips that are unparalleled. I didn’t go to school for fashion or textiles, unfortunately, but Sarai shares her knowledge so that I can be a better seamstress. A Burda pattern is great and everything, but Sarai will remind you always to stay-stitch your neckline or how easy it is to make your own bias tape…complete with free tutorials. How cool is that? Not to mention it’s in a stitch-bound booklet with a pocket to hold the pattern.

Now, after I said all of that…the Sorbetto is a free printable and still includes all of the Colette tips and reminders.

Tip about printing PDFs from online: print from Adobe Reader/Acrobat, NOT FROM BROWSER WINDOW. The browser will most likely want to include the URL line at the top and bottom. Also make sure to click ‘print full size’ when in your print driver window. These are things that will make your print ratio off and that is bad, mmmkay?

The instructions say to print them all, tape them all together and THEN print…you do as you like, this isn’t a complicated pattern and I preferred to cut them all out in the proper size then puzzle piece it together. I did it both ways just to make sure…and yeah, I prefer cutting first.

Pattern
Pattern

This is my uber scientific mathematic way to make sure Haze’s should fit her:

Hazel Pattern
Hazel Pattern

I cut everything out and got ready to do the sewing.

cut and stack
cut and stack

This is me sewing late at night and obviously having a ‘stuck’ moment…’where was I again?’

uuuuhhhh
uuuuhhhh

Oh, that’s right…transferring markings…

markings
markings

This pattern requires 1.5 yards, so for 2, I needed 3 yards. I was a bit short, so I didn’t cut my front piece on the fold. I backed it up, cut it with an added 1/4″ to piece it together. I figure with the sheerness of the fabric, it’s best to have a seam inside the pleat where it won’t show…that’s my theory and I’m sticking to it.

Fudging
Fudging

Here it is pieced together and seam flattened out and pressed….

Fudged together
Fudged together

I think it will be fine.

Oh, more action shots….stay stitching the collar line.

Stay Stitching
Stay Stitching

This is just stitching around the neckline at the 1/8″ mark to keep it from getting wonky as you throw it around and sew it up. That’s Boring, Oregon speak for: to keep the bias of the collar from stretching out and warping the structure of the garment.

I did one dart with it sewn and pressed down:

Darts ironed down
Darts ironed down

And one with the darts trimmed and finished.

darts trimmed and finished
darts trimmed and finished

I’m not sure that I have a preference at this point but I’m going to tinker with both.

Do you ever look at markings on a pattern and go, “Yeah, I’ll just put those marks on the fabric right through the pattern! Derp!” No, I’m not breaking out a wheel to perforate and chalk through the pattern. Luckily this pleat isn’t so bad. I marked the top and bottom of the pleat…

Pleat mark
Pleat mark

…then used a ruler to connect my line.

pleat mark close up
pleat mark close up

This is me starting to get really, really tired and happy the pleats are done and sewn down.

Pleats Done
Pleats Done

That’s the one with the seam in the middle…I think my plan worked….

This …this is the point where it is time to sew them together…but first, I’m going to break out my serger and finish my side seams. Handy dandy serger. After some sleep.

Serger Time
Serger Time

Action shots courtesy of Robert Wagner.

2 thoughts on “Sorbetto Part 1”

  1. So loving following you Becky. You are doing an awesome job, keep it up. Many will & are learning from you!

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